Zoo licence

Fees and policies

Fees 

We do not have a fixed fee for a zoo licence. The cost will be calculated on application. You will be charged the full costs we incur, including the charges made by any other professions we need to involve. 

Conditions 

After the inspection we may attach conditions to your licence. For example, that you’ll need to get insurance for any damage caused by the animals. 

Licence renewal 

Your licence will need to be renewed after 4 years. You might have to follow the same process you used to get the original licence. 

If you get your licence renewed it will then last for 6 years. You’ll need to apply to renew it again 6 months before it expires. 

Your rights of appeal 

Any person aggrieved by a refusal to be granted a licence or by any conditions to which the licence is subject, may appeal to the magistrates court and the courts may give such direction regarding the licence and its conditions as it thinks proper. 

Offences and penalties 

You could get a fine of up to £2,500 if you run a zoo without a licence or don’t follow the conditions of a licence. 

You could also get a fine of up to £1,000 if you: 

  • stop a zoo inspector doing their job properly 
  • don’t display your zoo licence properly 

Where we incur any expense in seizing, retaining or disposing of an animal then the person who was the keeper of the animal shall be liable for those costs. 

Refund policy 

Please note that refunds of licence fees are not normally given. Only in exceptional circumstances, as deemed by the licensing manager, will a refund be considered. Any refunds given may be subject to an administration charge. 

Failed application redress 

Please contact environmental health on 01782 717717 in the first instance. Any applicant who is refused a licence can appeal to their local magistrates' court. 

Licence holder redress 

Please contact environmental health on 01782 717717 in the first instance. Any licence holder who wishes to appeal against a condition attached to their licence can appeal to their local magistrates' court.