Dangerous wild animal licence

Fees and policies

Fees

  • First licence: £600 
  • Renewal: £300 

The applicant will also be required to pay the cost of inspections carried out by our authorised veterinary surgeon or veterinary practitioner. 

Licences are valid for two years from the date of issue. 

Your rights of appeal 

Any person aggrieved by a refusal to be granted a licence or by any conditions to which the licence is subject, may appeal to the magistrates court and the courts may give such direction regarding the licence and its conditions as it thinks proper. 

Offences and penalties 

Anybody found guilty of keeping an animal covered by the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 without a licence to do so or anybody found guilty of failing to comply with any licence condition shall be subject to a fine not exceeding £2,000. 

Any person found guilty of obstructing or delaying an inspector or authorised veterinary practitioner or veterinary surgeon shall be subject to a fine not exceeding £2,000. 

Where a person keeps an animal without a licence or where a person fails to comply with a licence condition, inspectors from the council may seize the animal and may either retain it or have it destroyed or disposed of (to a zoo or elsewhere) without compensation to the owner. 

Where we incur any expense in seizing, retaining or disposing of an animal then the person who was the keeper of the animal shall be liable for those costs. 

Refund policy 

Please note that refunds of licence fees are not normally given. Only in exceptional circumstances, as deemed by the licensing manager, will a refund be considered. Any refunds given may be subject to an administration charge. 

Failed application redress 

Please contact environmental health on 01782 717717 in the first instance. Any applicant who is refused a licence can appeal to their local magistrates' court. 

Licence holder redress 

Please contact environmental health on 01782 717717 in the first instance. Any licence holder who wishes to appeal against a condition attached to their licence can appeal to their local magistrates' court. 

Owner responsibilities 

A person is held to be the keeper of the animal if they have it in their possession. They remain the 'keeper' and therefore are responsible for the animal, even if it escapes or it is being transported. A licence holder has to contact the licensing authority for approval if animals are to be moved to another destination. 

Permission must be sought if the animal is to be moved into another borough or county. The relevant local authorities are required to consult with each other before permission can be granted.